Pre historic bengal

Written by ramanan50 I have written that the present State of Bengal ,India and Bangladesh date back to ancient times.

Pre historic bengal

Share1 Shares 2K Before man became a hunter and made his way to the top of the food chain, the Felidae, or cats, were the most successful, powerful predators in most of the world. Even today, big cats such as tigers, lions, jaguars and leopards keep causing admiration and fear, but these magnificent beasts are dwarfed by some of their extinct relatives.

At around kgs lbsit was as large as an African lioness, and was able to take on larger prey than its delicate modern day counterpart. Due to its living in colder environments than modern day Cheetahs, it is possible that the Giant Cheetah had longer fur and perhaps a lighter coloration.

History of Bengal

All of its teeth not only the canines had serrated edges to cut through flesh, and were more like the teeth of a shark or a carnivorous dinosaur, than the teeth of modern day cats. The remains of this cat have been found in Florida, along with those of giant prehistoric peccaries pig-like animals which were seemingly its favorite meal.

In prehistoric times, however, both North and South America were home to gigantic jaguars, belonging to the same species as modern day jags Panthera onca but much bigger. These giant jaguars also Pre historic bengal longer limbs and tails than jaguars living today; scientists believe that jaguars used to be open plain denizens, but that competition with American lions and other big cats forced them to adapt to more forested environments, where they developed their modern short-legged appearance.

Giant prehistoric jaguars were about the size of a fully grown lion or tiger, and were probably several times stronger, with a much stronger bite. There are two subspecies of prehistoric giant jaguars known to date; Panthera onca augusta, from North America, and Panthera onca messembrina, from South America also known as the Patagonian panther.

Both of them were active during the Pleistocene period, but went extinct about Nobody knows what the European Jaguar looked like; some scientists have suggested that it probably looked much like a modern day jaguar hence the nameor perhaps, a cross between a lion and a jaguar.

Pre historic bengal

Regardless of its external appearance, it is obvious that it was a huge predator, weighing up to kgs or more, and probably at the top of the food chain in Europe, 1.

It was one of the most dangerous and powerful predators during the last Ice Age in Europe, and there is evidence that it was feared, and perhaps worshiped, by prehistoric humans.

Plenty of cave paintings and a few statuettes have been found depicting the Cave Lion. Interestingly, these show the animal as having no mane; barely a ruff around the neck sometimes, as in modern day tigers.

Confusingly, some cave paintings also show the Cave Lion as having faint stripes on its legs and tail. This has led some scientists to suggest that perhaps the Cave Lion was actually more related to the Tiger.

Genetic studies on the ancient bones, however, have confirmed the original idea that the Cave Lion is, indeed, a lion after all — albeit, if cave artists are to be trusted, a very unusual looking one. It adapted well to a variety of habitats, including the sub-arctic tundra and survived for five million years until its extinction 10, years ago.

Homotherium was seemingly a pack hunter, adapted to fast running and active mostly during day thus avoiding competition with other, nocturnal predators.

It had very long forelegs and shorter hind legs, which gave it a slightly hyena-like appearance. Although Homotherium is not very famous for its size, some fossil remains of a Scimitar cat unearthed recently in the North Sea suggest that they could reach kgs lbs in weight, being larger than modern day Siberian tigers.

If you are wondering what these enormous, pack-hunting cats ate, some paleontologists believe that they were quite skilled mammoth hunters, although their ability to run at high speed would allow them to chase after fleet-footed animals as well.

Machairodus, on the other hand, probably looked pretty much like a gigantic tiger with saberteeth; it had very tiger-like proportions and a long tail, although it is impossible to know if it had stripes, spots or any other kind of fur markings.Pre-historic Bengal Stone age tools dating back 20, years have been excavated in the state.[5] Remnants of Copper Age settlements in the Bengal region date back 4, years.[6] Stone tools provide the earliest evidence of human settlements.

Prehistoric stone implements have been discovered in various parts of West Bengal in the districts of. The prehistory in Bengal came of age in the s and grew into a conscious and scientific discipline due mainly to Professor Dharani Sen and his pupils, and the explorations and, to a limited extent, excavations undertaken by the Archaeological Survey of India and the Directorate of West Bengal Archaeology did yield interesting results.

Prehistory Evidence of prehistoric and protohistoric human habitation and culture have been discovered in many parts of the Bengal basin.

Attempts have been made to correlate such evidence especially the tools, implements and other archaeological materials uncovered' geologically and geomorphologically with the landscape, sediments and soils for dating so that meaningful and reliable.

Prehistory Evidence of prehistoric and protohistoric human habitation and culture have been discovered in many parts of the Bengal basin. Attempts have been made to correlate such evidence especially the tools, implements and other archaeological materials uncovered' geologically and geomorphologically with the landscape, sediments and soils for dating so that meaningful and reliable.

Pre-historic Bengal. The ruins of Wari-Bateshwar in Narsingdi is believed to be from the copper age. Suggesting a thriving culture in ancient Bengal. An ancient inscription from the site of Mahasthangarh.

Top 5 largest prehistoric cats - Our Planet

Many of archaeological excavations. Top 5 largest prehistoric cats February 19, R. Giskard Reventlov Leave a comment Like all prehistoric counterparts of today’s animals, the prehistoric cats were usually larger, heavier and more robust than today’s felines.

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